Wednesday, August 5, 2015

TEACHING A GRANDCHILD

Today was a fun time with my granddaughter.  Grand children sometimes find it easier to learn something from a grandparent.  Not that they do not learn from a parent, but grandparents often have more time and patience to teach them a skill.


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When my granddaughter wanted to learn to sew I was more than willing to teach her.
Sewing is one of those skills they should want to do.  It would always be a good skill even if they did not like it.  The difference is they will have a lot more fun creating outfits if they like to sew.
Out of 5 granddaughters I have 2 so far that wanted to sew.  The others were interested in other skills, like cooking, reading, writing, painting, etc.

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One thing I do is to put postem notes on the sewing machine to guide the stitch size. As they use the postem note edge as a guide, it is easier for them to get the concept of not watching the needle.
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She even learned to use an iron. The iron is a very valuable tool when sewing. It makes it a lot easier when hems and the like are pressed for pinning
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Pinning was a little difficult, but for the first time she actually did very well. You have to get over being scared of getting stuck by a pin.
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She did a great job of sewing a straight stitch and zig-zaging the edge. A lot of machines now have a speed guide on them. At first we had it on the lowest speed. As she got better at it she reached up and turned the speed up herself. I think she will do just fine at this new skill.
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This is her completed skirt.  After sewing she was in the kitchen with me making a potato salad.  Cooking is another skill she is interested in.


Wednesday, April 22, 2015

HONORING OUR PARENTS

Currently my husband and I are helping out with both our elderly mothers.  We count it an honor and privilage to do so.  
As parents we tried to instill this into our own children.  As grandparents we made a point of telling our grandchildren to listen, obey, and honor their parents also. 

To say that we agreed with our parents on everything would be a lie.  But we honor what they stood for and how they brought us into the world, loved us, took care of us, taught us, disciplined us, supported us, laughed and cried with us.

This may not be true for everyone.  But, I found it interesting while searching the scriptures that when it says to honour our Father and Mother it does not give any stipulation.  Just that we are to do so. 

Christ did state that family members would be divided by believing in Him.  But it still does not say that we are not to honor are Father and Mother because of it.

Below are some scriptures I found while searching Father and Mother.  

Exo 20:12  Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.

Exo 21:15  And he that smiteth his father, or his mother, shall be surely put to death.


Lev 19:3  Ye shall fear every man his mother, and his father, and keep my sabbaths: I am the LORD your God.

Deu 5:16  Honour thy father and thy mother, as the LORD thy God hath commanded thee; that thy days may be prolonged, and that it may go well with thee, in the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.

Deu 27:16  Cursed be he that setteth light (hold in contemt) by his father or his mother. And all the people shall say, Amen.

Pro 1:8  My son, hear the instruction of thy father, and forsake not the law of thy mother:

Pro 19:26  He that wasteth his father, and chaseth away his mother, is a son that causeth shame, and bringeth reproach.

Pro 19:27  Cease, my son, to hear the instruction that causeth to err from the words of knowledge.

Pro 23:22  Hearken unto thy father that begat thee, and despise not thy mother when she is old.

Pro 28:24  Whoso robbeth his father or his mother, and saith, It is no transgression; the same is the companion of a destroyer.

Pro 30:11  There is a generation that curseth their father, and doth not bless their mother.

Pro 30:17  The eye that mocketh at his father, and despiseth to obey his mother, the ravens of the valley shall pick it out, and the young eagles shall eat it.

Mat 15:4  For God commanded, saying, Honour thy father and mother: and, He that curseth father or mother, let him die the death.

Mat 15:5  But ye say, Whosoever shall say to his father or his mother, It is a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me;

Mat 15:6  And honour not his father or his mother, he shall be free. Thus have ye made the commandment of God of none effect by your tradition.

Mat 19:19  Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.

Mar 7:10  For Moses said, Honour thy father and thy mother; and, Whoso curseth father or mother, let him die the death:

Mar 7:11  But ye say, If a man shall say to his father or mother, It is Corban, that is to say, a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me; he shall be free.

Mar 7:12  And ye suffer him no more to do ought for his father or his mother;

Mar 7:13  Making the word of God of none effect through your tradition, which ye have delivered: and many such like things do ye

Mar 10:19  Thou knowest the commandments, Do not commit adultery, Do not kill, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Defraud not, Honour thy father and mother.

Eph 6:2  Honour thy father and mother; (which is the first commandment with promise;)

Eph 6:3  That it may be well with thee, and thou mayest live long on the earth.

Friday, March 27, 2015

MY 65TH BIRTHDAY

Today was my 65th birthday.  A milestone for many and me included.  Today I am reflecting on my Christian life.  I believe Elizabeth Elliot said it best.  Even though I did not grow up as she did, I have seen what she has seen over all these years.

My Little Frame of Reference

God's Guidance: A Slow and Certain Light Elizabeth Elliot

God leads me, I believe, within my own frame of reference. What I am, where I am, how I got there, all have a great deal too do with what my frame of reference is.
Consider, for example, the vast differences between the frames of reference of Rahab, the harlot, David, the handsome young keeper of sheep, Esther, the loveliest woman in a heathen king’s harem, and a tax collector named Matthew. What of a redheaded monk in Germany, a noblewoman in the court of Louis XIV, a Russian pilgrim seeking in the forests and steppes the meaning of the Jesus Prayer, a Bible Belt farmwife, a Japanese university student, a Jewish psychiatrist, or a Long Island Episcopalian?
 I grew up in a middle-class fundamentalist family in Philadelphia. Family prayers, Sunday school and church, table talk about God and Christian people and Christian work were very much a part of the fabric of my life. It hardly occurred to me that God needed to meet different people in different ways, or that his truth could take forms that would be unrecognizable to me. I saw a certain kind of Christianity in operation, and to me that was what it meant to be a Christian.

 It took a while for my imagination to go to work to apply that vision to people in other categories such as those listed above, but in the meantime God met me where I was.


When I began to learn of the wideness in his mercy, my faith began to grow, and I saw that salvation was a scheme of infinitely vaster dimensions than I had dreamed. Whatever our views, they are probably too narrow. Our God is, as J.B. Phillips has said, too small. But the wonderful thing is that God is willing to start there. He can lead us into what the psalmist calls large and even wealthy places.